Spine 64

SPINE
An appreciative overview of each spine number from the 5-inch era: cover art, 12-inch history, auteurship, release dates, critical consensus, and poster art from around the globe.



THE THIRD MAN
CAROL REED
GREAT BRITAIN – 1949

Five Inch

SPINE 64
SD – 11/30/99
HD – 12/16/08
TWELVE Inch
SPINE 5
CLV – 1ST PRINTING 1985
CLV – 2ND PRINTING 1989
COVER ART – LUCIEN S.Y. YANG
CRITERION
IMDB
WIKI
RT
CRITERION FORUM

♥♥♥♥♥

 

 

 

Dual Format

 

In August of 2013, Criterion proudly announced the coming of the dual format packaging for November of that year. Peter Becker took the time to blog a very descriptive post on their thinking around this decision. The reasons were (and still are) quite compelling for this paean to economies of scale.

Having two physical packages to produce has cut those economies of scale in half. Instead of one big, cost-effective run of DVD packaging, we now need two different runs, each about half as big, one for Blu-ray and one for DVD. But to make the packaging affordable on a per-unit basis, we still need to run the original big, cost-effective quantity of each, meaning, essentially, making twice what we need. The Blu-ray may sell briskly, and the packaging may need to be reordered fairly soon, but the DVD stocks will take longer to dwindle. When we finally run out of DVD packaging, printing another big, cost-effective run will not be an option, because we would never sell enough of the copies to pay for the packaging. And at the price for printing a small run, we might be losing money on every copy we sell. What do we do?

And so from November 26th, 2013  until August 24th of 2014, Criterion released a total of 40 dual format packages during this grand experiment. A combination of new releases, new printings of previous releases, and even full-on upgrades were produced. Various packaging formats were used from digipaks, massive boxsets, cardboard sleeves, to slightly modified plastic cases.

And then, not even 10 months later.

Peter Becker again:

Last November, when we announced that we would start releasing dual-format editions, we hoped that we had found an alternative that would address our concerns about packaging costs across two formats, while guaranteeing that both DVD and Blu-ray customers would still have access to an identical product. While we did solve that problem, no one seemed particularly happy with the solution. Blu-ray customers didn’t like making room for DVDs they didn’t want, and DVD customers didn’t like paying more to get a Blu-ray they couldn’t play. We soon found that we had to start releasing stand-alone DVD editions alongside the dual-format ones because a fairly large proportion of our audience has not made the leap to Blu-ray yet. And once we had separate DVD editions, what was the point of putting DVDs in with the Blu-rays? A good question.

And with that the dual format medium was dead.

Or was it?

May 30th, 2017 brought the release of the World Cinema Project Vol. 2 in all its gargantuan dual format heft. It appears that as long as Scorsese continues to provide Criterion with these beautiful bricks of cinema, the format won’t truly be put to rest.

 

                             

Hour 9

I really enjoy doing this podcast. Not so much that I need to work on it every day, but it is a personal joy to come back to this every few weeks and put down some more thoughts on our modern wax cylinders about why the Criterion Collection means so much to me and to others. Every episode has been a joy, but I have to say that this ninth hour seems particularly special to me due to the topics and wonderful conversation.

This hour allows me to share some general details about my recent trip to The Criterion Collection offices in Manhattan. Don’t get excited, there are no spoilers or scoops here, just a few minutes of me going on and on about how it was such a pleasure to visit the place and to spend a short amount of time letting Jonathan Turell know how much their output means to me (and to so many of you and others).

I hate to sound like a party pooper or a broken record, but I must mention here what I mention in the piece:

The Criterion Collection offices are not open to the public and it must be stressed that you shouldn’t just show up expecting to be given the red carpet treatment or to be able to really speak with anyone other than the receptionist. These are busy people with jobs to do and they don’t want you to be disappointed. My visit was a long time coming and was developed through a classic “friend of a friend” situation. Even with that, I was in and out pretty quickly so that I wouldn’t waste too much of anyone’s busy day at work.

From there please listen along and enjoy a super conversation with filmmaker Michael Worth. Michael is an accomplished actor who has taken his love of film in general and the CC in particular and carved out a nice niche in the indie market as not only an actor, but also as a director/writer/producer of features. Michael graciously reached out to me to offer his thoughts on being in the business and how a love of Criterion and collecting informs his work. It was a true pleasure to speak with Michael recently, and a lot of the conversation didn’t even make it to this hour. You can look for much more of our conversation in an upcoming “Deleted Scenes” episode of this program.

Michael Worth

If you couldn’t tell already, I’m very pleased to offer this hour to you! Come along as we get uncomfortable listening to another creepy song about collectors, take a creepy boat ride as we enter the hallowed halls of Criterion, segue through another creepy song about being complete and then a full hour of decidedly non-creepy conversation with our considered guest.

  • No time to gab, let’s get on with the “hour.”
  • keeproductions presents A Visit to Criterion | 4m 40s
  • A conversation with Michael Worth | 16m 00s

Michael Worth

Grizzly Peak Films

Michael @ IMDB

@michaelworth

 

Keith Enright

@keeproductions
criterioncompletion.com
www.facebook.com/groups/criterioncompletion/
keith (at) criterioncompletion.com

 

 

January 2018

MONTHLY
The official mid-month slate announcement information. Titles and upgrade info across labels and formats for three months hence. Spine numbers and release dates on hover. Click through for official package detail from the source.


CC SETS: 5
CC TITLES: 5
ES SETS: 1
ES TITLES: 4
TO BD UPGRADES: 1
FROM LD UPGRADES: 0

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

Spine 63

SPINE
An appreciative overview of each spine number from the 5-inch era: cover art, 12-inch history, auteurship, release dates, critical consensus, and poster art from around the globe.



CARNIVAL OF SOULS
herk harvey
united states – 1962

Five Inch

SPINE 63
SD – 05/16/00
HD – 07/12/16
COVER ART – Edward Kinsella
CRITERION
IMDB
WIKI
RT
CRITERION FORUM

♥♥♥♥